Study: Hackers can get your credit card info in 6 seconds just by guessing it

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In troubling news, a paper from researchers at Newcastle University in the UK claims that Visa’s credit-card payment system can be compromised online in “as little as six seconds.” The security flaw was possibly the point of entry for the cyber-attack on the UK’s Tesco Bank that lost £2.5 million.

This isn’t some high-level hacking going on here either — all it takes for a determined thief to grab a treasure trove full of card data is a laptop with an internet connection and some basic guesswork, the paper says. 

SEE ALSO: How to protect yourself while online shopping for the holidays

The team of researchers, led by PhD student Mohammed Ali, call the method “the Distributed Guessing Attack.” It’s a simple approach: a thief generates random numbers to guess combinations of card numbers, expiration dates and CVV codes (that three-digit number typically found on the back of the card). The video below demonstrates just how easy it is to generate all of these fields quickly: Read more…

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Uber can now track you after a ride and some people are creeped out

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LONDON — Uber has introduced a new feature that allows the app to gather users’ location data for up to 5 minutes after a ride has ended.  

SEE ALSO: UberEats has surge pricing now

Prior to this latest update, Uber only collected location information during a passenger’s trip and only while the app was running in the foreground. No data was collected after the drop-off.

However, the company now intends to collect location information for the five minute period following the ride. And — unless the user opts out — Uber asks customers to always share their location even when they aren’t using the service.  Read more…

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Uber can now track you after a ride and some people are creeped out

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LONDON — Uber has introduced a new feature that allows the app to gather users’ location data for up to 5 minutes after a ride has ended.  

SEE ALSO: UberEats has surge pricing now

Prior to this latest update, Uber only collected location information during a passenger’s trip and only while the app was running in the foreground. No data was collected after the drop-off.

However, the company now intends to collect location information for the five minute period following the ride. And — unless the user opts out — Uber asks customers to always share their location even when they aren’t using the service.  Read more…

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'Pizzagate' — The deranged conspiracy theory that jumped from hashtag to IRL violence

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On Sunday afternoon, an armed man walked into pizzeria Comet Ping Pong in Washington, D.C., firing his weapon at least once and causing a whole lot of havoc.

SEE ALSO: Reddit’s Trump trolls are freaking out—and they’re right

The reason for his actions? He was there to “self-investigate” an online conspiracy theory now handily known to those online as “Pizzagate,” one of the weirdest, most grotesque Hillary Clinton conspiracy theories ever circulated (which is saying something). 

But to the casual news consumer, this may be the first they’ve heard of Pizzagate. So, if this is you, here’s the backstory. Read more…

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How yelldesign is changing the short-form content game with paper and scissors

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 Four years ago, Melbourne resident Matt Willis crashed his bike. He didn’t know that the next two months in hospital would transform his life.   During his time off work, the design consultant discovered the Vine app and began producing stop motion videos, bringing to life ordinary household items in seamless six-second clips.    

Eight months into his Vine career, Willis was approached by brands that were interested in collaborating on stop motion videos, and yelldesign was born. 

Now in his fourth year, Willis heads up a team of nine video artists, illustrators, sound designers and paper crafters to make viral stop motion videos for clients such as Visa, Twitter, Samsung and more. Success accompanied the growth: In 2014, yelldesign was nominated for a Vine creativity Streamy award and two Tropvine awards at Tropfest, the world’s largest short film festival.    Read more…

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Oculus Touch finally makes the Rift a complete VR experience

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Imagine trying to climb a mountain without using your hands. That’s what it’s been like using an Oculus Rift since the category-defining virtual reality headset landed in March. 

The Touch controllers, available Dec. 6, change all of that.

SEE ALSO: Here’s how a VR kitchen could transform holiday shopping

Oculus Touch at last gives Rift users a way to interact with VR environments using their hands. Until now, Rift experiences have been limited to experiences that rely on a standard video game controller or the headset’s included remote control.

The moon-shaped controllers arrive as a pair, one for each hand. They’re not nearly as bulky as the wands for the HTC Vive, and their natural contours guide you to a comfortable, button-accessible grip every time you pick them up. Read more…

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IBM predicted Amazon Go back in 2006

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Amazon’s splashy video for Amazon Go — an all-seeing, all-knowing store where customers can grab items, toss ‘em in a bag or pocket and just walk out without ever waiting in line — has obvious appeal. So obvious, in fact, that another tech company proposed the exact same concept more than 10 years ago.

SEE ALSO: Amazon’s new app will 'see’ inside your packages

An IBM ad showcasing a smart store got major circulation on the airwaves in 2006 (when YouTube was nascent). It features a nefarious-looking character in a trench coat wandering the aisles of a supermarket, stuffing his pockets with items as other patrons and security guards shoot him looks of suspicion. As he exits the store through what looks like a security gate that “flashes” him, the guard calls out, “Excuse me, sir!” Read more…

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Samsung cut it too close with saftey margins on the Note7's design, report says

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More than two months after the launch of ill-fated Note7, we still don’t know what caused the batteries in some of the devices to overheat and, in some cases, explode. 

A new report by Instrumental, a company that helps tech companies fix manufacturing issues, suggests that the reason behind the Note7 issues was Samsung pushing the boundaries of the design a little too far. 

SEE ALSO: Jet Black Samsung Galaxy S7 may be coming to soothe your Note7 blues

More precisely, Instrumental — after tearing down and examining a Note7 — found that the Note7’s battery sits too tightly within the device, so that pressure from normal operation (such as sitting down while having the phone in your back pocket) can cause layers of lithium cobalt oxide and graphite to touch. This should never happen, as it can cause overheating and an explosion.  Read more…

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Touching things in VR with your real hands is a total game changer

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The first thing you instinctively want to do after strapping on a VR headset and diving into a virtual world is to reach out and touch what you see.

Unfortunately, this is not a reality on today’s most popular VR headsets. Well, official support isn’t. Instead, VR headsets either rely on traditional gamepads like the Xbox One controller (Oculus Rift), custom hand controllers (HTC Vive/Rift), side-mounted touchpads on the headset (Samsung Gear VR), or wireless remotes (Google Daydream View).

I’ve tried all of these controls, and while they work fine, none of them feel completely intuitive or natural; there’s a learning curve for all of them. The Vive’s hand controllers and the Rift’s Touch controllers are good attempts at mimicking your hands, but neither provides full-finger tracking. Read more…

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Google's new app will help loved ones find you in an emergency

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When something goes wrong, one of the first things you think about is getting in touch with the people you care about. But if there’s been a natural disaster, an accident or some other emergency, that may be a lot easier said than done. 

Google’s latest app, called Trusted Contacts, aims to fix that. The app allows friends and family members to remotely share their location with just one touch. 

SEE ALSO: Facebook creates Community Help tool so users can aid each other after disasters

When you sign up for the app, you designate specific people in your address book as “trusted contacts.” This allows you to share your location at any given time and allows them to request your location.  Read more…

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Google Allo gets Hindi language support

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Google just opened its AI-driven app Allo to hundreds of millions of new users.  

Google said Monday Allo is getting support for Hindi, one of India’s widest spoken languages. The assistant, which a user can trigger using the keyword “@google”, now understands as well as responds in Hindi language. 

SEE ALSO: Google launches Allo, its AI-centric messaging app

The company first demoed the feature at its Google for India event in September, with company’s executives emphasising their continued efforts to tailor their services for the Indian market. 

“We are enthused by this and today’s launch enables us to extend these features to the next millions of users in a language of their choice,” Amit Fulay, Group Product Manager, Google said in a press statement.  Read more…

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